"The best times you are going to have in life are at the dinner table and in bed." Old Italian saying. So relax, and enjoy the simple things!

Wednesday, November 13, 2013

Pear Chestnut Soup #French Fridays with Dorie

Yum
Pear Chestnut Soup: Simple Living and Eating


My grandmother, Marietta lived next door to me and whenever I was bored I would go to her house and check in with her…to see what she was cooking or to just play cards.

This particular day I came upon Marietta sitting in her rocking chair crocheting yet another odd colored afghan, she always got her wool on sale, and you could tell!



What happened to your wrist?

The &%^*! driver of the senior bus took a sharp turn, and I fell and broke it.

The next time I saw my grandmother she was playing pinochle with some of her Italian friends. They had roasted chestnuts and she was cracking them with her cast. I was horrified when I saw her doing this.

What are you doing? Pointing to her wrist. 

Her reply, Well, at least it's a gooda for something!

I'm not sure if using your cast as a nutcracker is a good way to heal a fracture… but my grandmother was a very practical woman who loved chestnuts.

As soon as the weather got cold my family always roasted chestnuts, and we loved just eating them out the shell, still warm from the oven.

I never thought to make soup with them. I have to say, the light nutty flavor of chestnuts combine with the sweetness of Autumn pears is a fantastic combination. I used fresh rosemary as the top note to this luscious cold weather soup. Rosemary was a wonderful counter flavor to the earthiness of the chesnuts… really delicious. 

Click on here for an adaptation of this Pear Chestnut Soup, but for the real deal I highly recommend putting, Around My French Table on your holiday gift list. You will not regret buying this cookbook. 


You are invited to join my new linky party. Cook a recipe of your choice from the chosen country and explore the world with us.  Dec 10th we will be sharing dishes from Germany.



Add your email to our list and I will remind you a week before the party and on the day of the party so you won't forget to link up.







Note: As a member of French Friday's with Dorie I am not allowed to print the recipe. I invite you to take a look at this wonderful cookbook "Around My French Table" if you are interested in this or any other recipe I review. 



Click here to see how the other Dorista's did.




This post is being shared on the following food/craft parties. Please check them out: 

Tuesday Food:
Wednesday Food:
Thursday Food:
Friday Food:







26 comments:

  1. It's a very lovely post Diane !!
    And I've never tasted chestnut soup, yet alone with pears - sounds sooooooooooooo unique and I'm intrigued

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Winnie,
      My grandmother was a character. I hope you try the soup. It is different.

      Delete
  2. This is too wonderful, Diane. I love the visual of your grandmother cracking those chestnuts. Although I haven't tasted roasted chestnuts for years, now that I am back in Colorado with a "real" fireplace, I will roast some over the holidays. (Which are just two weeks away, egads.) I am making my FFWD soup today. Did you like it?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Mary,
      My grandmother was a strong little lady... having been a farmer made her tough. I did love the soup.

      Delete
  3. The soup looks lovely. I've never had chestnuts, but I've been wondering about them because our school has a couple chestnut trees that drop the nuts all over the place. Chloe comes home with her backpack full of them frequently, lol.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You should roast them up they are delicious.

      Delete
    2. I've been thinking I should. Hate seeing them just shrivel up, knowing they can be used for something good.

      Delete
  4. Love the story about your grandmother! Chestnuts are not common here so I have no such wonderful memories.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think many people eat chestnuts even in the US Northeast where they are so associated with Thanksgiving, but Italians seem to be fond of them,

      Delete
  5. My grandmother frequently makes an appearance in my writing but never so colorful as this. I will have to change that. I don't have much of a history with this food beyond the paste used in desserts. I will have to change that.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Funny, eating in an Italian bubble... I just assumed everyone else ate chestnuts and artichokes.

      Delete
  6. I love the story about your grandma! What a hoot! I wish I had tasted some of her roasted chestnuts :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They were delicious as long as you kept your hands far enough away from her cracking cast... ouch.

      Delete
  7. What a great story about your grandmother! It made me laugh out loud. I'm glad to hear you discovered a new way to enjoy chestnuts. They are so good, aren't they? Have a great weekend.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We used to tease my grandmother all the time and she would say, "When I die, no more fun." Little does she know that the memories of her are still making people LOL. I think she would have enjoyed chestnut soup.

      Delete
  8. I love the memories of your grandmother, and the photo is priceless. My mother used to crochet…I have many afghans sitting in my closets. My kids all took a few when they left for college…they are now prized possessions. I also grew up living next door to my grandmother. Nice to have so many good memories from back then. Your soup looks luscious…love your photo! Have a lovely weekend, Diane!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We have so much in common and your heritage is Mediterranean too. Did your mother buy discount wool too? The colors in my grandmother's afghans were even strange for the 70's.

      Delete
  9. I love the story of your Italian grandmother! Wonderful post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Guyla she was a real character.

      Delete
  10. I can just picture your grandma cracking chestnuts on her cast - I love it! I wonder if chestnuts are a regional thing? I grew up having never eaten them or knowing anyone who did (on the West Coast).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think they are definitely Northeast. The trees grow around here. Casts were a lot thicker in 1970's.

      Delete
  11. I tot I left my comment here earlier.....
    Thoroughly enjoyed your post about chestnuts and love your grandma! She's so practical!

    ReplyDelete
  12. My grandmother used to make those zig zag blankets with all her odds and ends of yarn. I still have a few of them :-)
    Great story.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My brother has most of them, I just have to chuckle when I see the color combinations... they still kill me.

      Delete
  13. What a great story! It sounds like your grandmother was quite a character. Reading everyone's posts has made me want to try freshly roasted chestnuts. I feel like I'm missing out!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The smell is actually better than the taste.

      Delete