"The best times you are going to have in life are at the dinner table and in bed." Old Italian saying. So relax, and enjoy the simple things!

Wednesday, February 26, 2014

Garbure from the Supermarket: Pork Stew #French Fridays with Dorie

Garbure: Pork Stew: simplelivingeating.com


The name of this dish: Garbure from the Supermarket is very deceiving. I thought all of the ingredients in it would be easily found in my grocery store. Well, not in a U.S. grocery store. The seasoning Piment d' Espelette I couldn't even find in a speciality market. Fortunately a kind Dorista told me that I could substitute cayenne pepper for it. I order some on line and look forward to tasting what others have described as an exceptionally flavorful pepper.


Navy beans, spanish onions, leeks, shallots, garlic, carrots, turnips, potatoes and green cabbage along with chicken broth were all easily found in my local Stop n Shop. 


Garbure: Pork Stew: simplelivingeating.com

Garlic Sausage I bought at the butchers along with the pork shoulder. He was out of pork shoulder and recommend pork butt with the bone which he kindly chopped up into large chunks for the stew. I thought I just throw out: "Do you have any duck confit?" I had no clue what I was asking for, but the response was, "Oh, yes, in the freezer section." "You know duck confit really doesn't have to be frozen. It is preserved in salt and it's own fat… a very ancient technique that predates refrigeration."

So I learned that duck confit is basically a duck leg that is seasoned and preserved and can be kept for years jarred. It is added to many French dishes. The flavor is super packed and intense. If you can find duck confit I highly recommend throwing it into your next soup or stew and you'll be amazed at the gourmet flavor it produces.

Garbure is traditionally simmered on the stove all day until it gets so thick you can stand a spoon up in it. I decided to test this out and sure enough midday, my trusty wooden spoon was standing up straight in the pot.


Garbure: Pork Stew: simplelivingeating.com

I choose to make this soup/stew on Sunday because we were maple sugaring that day, and I was expecting a family that included two teenage twins to come help out with making maple syrup. Yes, we tap our maple trees every year and get a gallon or two of syrup out of it.

Well, sometimes instant messaging on Facebook is not the best form of communication; dates got confused. Instead my family of four ended up with a pot of stew that could have feed 20. I was told it freezes well. We are expecting the cold weather to return which will stop the flow of sap, so maybe we will just thaw the Garbure out in two weeks for our next sap burn?


Me supervising sap as it reduces to maple syrup in our backyard. 

Most Dorista's complained about the vegetables breaking down too much from the long cooking process. This did happen to me also, but I enjoyed how thick the stew got. Though in retrospect the next time I make Garbure. I plan on browning the meat, placing it in the bottom of a slow cooker, putting the beans over it and topping it off with the vegetables and broth. If I slow cook it on low for 6 to 8 hours the meat will get tender, and the vegetables won't get over cooked, plus I don't have to regularly be checking a pot that is simmering on the stove.

Here is a Garbure recipe, but you know the deal if you want Dorie Greenspan's (and you do) you need to get the cookbook: Around my French Table


Note: As a member of French Friday's with Dorie I am not allowed to print the recipe. I invite you to take a look at this wonderful cookbook "Around My French Table" if you are interested in this or any other recipe I review. 



Click here to see how the other Dorista's did.





This post is shared on the following food/craft parties: 


Tuesday Food:
Hearth & Soul Blog Hop @ 21st Century Housewife
Totally Tasty Tuesday @ Mandy's Recipe Box
Show Me What You Got @ Our Delightful Home
In & Out of the Kitchen @ Feeding Big & More
Tuesday's Table @ Love in the Kitchen
Tasty Tuesday #Anyonita Nibbles
Share your Stuff Tuesday @ Table for Seven

Wednesday Food:

From Dream to Reality @ DYI Dreamer
 Wednesday Whatsit @White Lights on Wednesday 
Fresh Foods Wednesdays @ Gastronomical Sovereignty
Wonderful Food Wednesdays at @ All She Cooks
Look What I Made @ Creations by Kara

Thursday Food:

Full Plate Thursday @ Miz Helen's Country Cottage
Thriving on Thursdays @ Domesblissity


Friday Food:

Foodie Friday @ Home Maid Simple
Friday Favorite (DYI too) @ Simple Sweet Home
Foodie Friday @ Rattlebridge Farm 
Weekend Potluck @ Sunflower Supper Club
Friday Linky Party @ The Pin Junkie 
Freedom Fridays @ Love Bakes Good Cakes
Inspiration Spotlight @ Dear Creatives

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23 comments:

  1. that sounds nice and warming! One day I'd love to come learn how to tap maple trees with you.

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    1. I would love to show you. We have friends coming over today that work at a nature school for kids that we are going to show.

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  2. What a delicious stew! I don't even bother looking for specialty items in Iowa anymore. I can't even find passion fruit juice. ;) I definitely need to give this a try!!

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    1. I know the recipes a month in advance I could order items on line. Amazon seems to carry everything.

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  3. There is something about duck fat that makes everything taste better (even duck meat).
    This soup did make a very large batch - I have been pawning it off on anyone who will eat it all week.

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    1. Yes, I was told that the best roasted chicken is smeared with duck fat.

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  4. Love the picture with the spoon standing up. It certainly was thick and meaty.

    I also thought that this one would be easy to shop for. In fact, I couldn't even find duck confit in the local specialty stores. Which was surprising, because I've certainly seen it pop up on restaurants menus. If I ever find it I'm going to try to make cassoulet.

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    1. Ask a butcher shop I bet they could order it for you. I was surprised that mine had it.

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  5. Your photos are great! Yeah, we ate this for days and days, but I loved every spoonful :)

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    1. It does taste even better the next day. Thanks...still working on photography. I have good and bad days.

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  6. This is definitely a good one for a crowd. Your photo of the spoon standing up in the pot made me laugh out loud. And, I love the photo of you watching the maple boiling. We're anxiously awaiting tours starting at the local sugar house, a sign that winter might be over soon. We are big fans of duck confit. My husband is curing some in the basement right now. I can't wait until it's ready.

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    1. My husband hasn't hunted in years. Wow making your own confit that sounds really cool.

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  7. It definitely made enough to feed a small army! We ate it for several days…and found it delicious! One of my favorite meals so far from AMFT. Great photos, Diane! Your dinner looks wonderful! Happy Weekend!

    I have always wanted to try making my own Maple syrup…such fun and so rewarding!

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    1. I bet you have the quite a few maple trees were you live Kathy. You'll need a small army to help you. The buckets have to be emptied every day, twice a day and the cooking down process takes hours.

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  8. I like how you convert some of your recipes to slow cooker (crockpot) dishes. It's so much easier for me to throw something into the slow cooker and get on with my day. While making this garbure, I did realize that it would work great but I already was making applesauce in my crockpot. . Although I halved the garbure ingredients and doubled the beans, I made a lot of soup. It was good. I enjoyed it over and over and over!!! Harvesting your own syrup is very cool and I bet it tastes fantastic.

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    1. Yes, I find I want to throw everything in the crockpot. But I was foiled the other day trying to make a black bean soup. Even though I soaked the beans overnight they just weren't cooking in the crockpot. I had to transfer the whole thing to the stove.
      Our maple syrup is tasty,,, flowery, but it is a little thin. It get's thicker as you go further north.

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  9. LOVE the spoon picture. It was nice and thick, wasn't it. Lots of goodies. None leftover here to freeze.

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    1. Wow, you must have some hearty appetites... good for you.

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  10. I also loved that spoon picture- too funny ! But I really enjoyed reading about your maple syrup. When we first started visiting Vermont we learned so much about the sugar shacks, the blue plastic lines that go from tree to tree, and how much sap it takes to make a wee bit of syrup. So cool that you do that at your home !!! Now back to FFWD- lovely results with the garbure and great job on getting all the meats. And I too am on team crockpot. Simplifies life and saves time.

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  11. I really like the slow cooker idea. I'm going to try that next time too. I am so jealous that you are able to get syrup out of your trees. I love maple syrup and it is so expensive.

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    1. It is obsurdly expensive and it is just going to get more so, because weird weather doesn't help the sap flow.

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  12. Love that you have maple trees and tap them. It must be so satisfying to have your own syrup (not to mention cheaper). Your garbure looks wonderful and I especially love the photo of the spoon test.

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  13. Your garbure looks great, but I am fascinated that you tap your own maple syrup!

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