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Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Osso Buco in a Tomato Orange Sauce: Osso Buco å l' Arman #French Fridays with Dorie

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Osso Buco in a Tomato Orange Sauce: Osso Buco a l arman: simplelivingeating.com


I didn't know that the French had hijacked the beloved Italian dish: Osso Buco? I grew up eating this dish flavored with a lot of pepper and garlic. Dorie Greenspan's recipe a l' Arman (after the French artist) is a lot more sophisticated and very French. It contains oranges and herbes de Provence.


I love the ingredients in this recipe, but I did not like the cooking instructions. I found them to be tedious, and they didn't always appear to me to really add that much to the taste; so I streamlined the recipe.

I also reduced the amount of orange.. it seemed excessive, especially for my family's taste buds. I also decided that if the can tomatoes were to be cut, I would just use diced tomatoes and skip fresh ones all together. It seemed redundant. 

The result was a very satisfying indeed! The boys loved the meat, and the girls loved the way the meat flavored the vegetables... everyone was happy filling their plates with their taste in portion of meat to vegetables. I made saffron rice with this dish and it was an excellent accompaniment.

Great meal for a Fall Sunday dinner, as I found out on my dog walk that day when people asked me what I was making for dinner that night...everyone loves Osso Buco! 


Osso Buco in a Tomato Orange Sauce: Osso Buco a l arman: simplelivingeating.com



Osso Buco in a Tomato Orange Sauce

by Diane Balch
simplelivingeating.com

adapted from Dorie Greenspan's: Osso Buco a l'Arman from Around my French Table

preparation: 30 minute                                      serves: 4


Ingredients:

4 veal shanks small 2 inches thick tied with string (look for humanely raised: Whole Foods)
1 large onion chopped
2 garlic cloves minced
2 teaspoons of dried thyme
2 teaspoons of dried basil
2 teaspoons of herbs de Provence
1 28 ounce can of diced tomatoes
1 cup of chicken broth
4 large carrots coined (sliced like a coin)
1 orange's zest
4 tablespoons of Extra-Virgin olive oil (EVOO)
salt and pepper


Directions:

1) Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.

2) Pour 1 tablespoon of EVOO into a dutch oven on medium high heat. Make sure the oil is hot. Sear the (salted) shanks for about 4 minutes per side. Remove shanks from pan.

3) Add the remanding 3 tablepsoons of EVOO to the dutch oven and sauté the onions, carrots, garlic with a little salt and pepper. Add the herbs so they can bloom: thyme, basil, herbs de Provence. 

4) Add the tomatoes, chicken broth and orange zest. Bring this to a boil. Stir occasionally.

5) When the broth comes to a boil shut off the burner and add the shanks. Cover them in broth and vegetables and place them covered in the oven for 2 hours. The meat should fall off of the bone when done. 


Serve over saffron rice or risotto. 




Note: As a member of French Friday's with Dorie I am not allowed to print the recipe. I invite you to take a look at this wonderful cookbook "Around My French Table" if you are interested in this or any other recipe I review. 


28 comments:

  1. As I will not eat veal, is there another meat you would recommend for making this recipe?

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  2. I couldn't justify zesting so many oranges either (we used one orange zest + juice). This was a dish that was perfect for streamlining. Smart thinking.

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    1. There was definitely plenty of orange flavor just from the zest I put in... I'm glad I didn't zest and juice all those oranges too. Glad you enjoyed it.

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  3. I made the recipe as-is and the orange flavor was borderline. We liked it just fine, but I think it was a good idea to alter it! I, too, used all canned tomatoes as the mixture of fresh and canned seemed a little silly, especially since I didn't have any fresh tomatoes on hand anyway. I love your idea of saffron rice and am definitely going to try that! I can see how the warmth of the saffron complements the dish while also providing a good contrast!

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    1. For a tasty recipe the technique was a bit odd. Good to hear that as is the orange was OK.

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  4. You always do such a terrific job streamlining the recipes. And Bill would agree with you...too much orange! But he still enjoyed his meal :)

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    1. Sorry you didn't get the word about the orange. I didn't really think about it until I was about to zest and squeeze 4 oranges and my brain went: wait! Glad Bill liked it anyway.

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  5. You did a great job making this recipe fit your needs! I had the last of my garden tomatoes hanging around when I made this dish…so I added them. Quite honestly I did not think they added to the flavor…and I only used one orange and it was plenty! Yours looks terrific…nicely done, Diane! Happy Halloween!

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    1. I'm glad to see that I am not alone on the orange and fresh tomato thing... Those of us who've made osso buco before get what needs to be in it.

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  6. There were a few fussy techniques in this recipe. I like your streamlined version. I don't eat veal and couldn't find any other kinds of shanks this week, but found it worked fine with lamb shoulder. And I didn't know that I liked osso buco before this week because I'd never had it before. Now I'm on the bandwagon!

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  7. Pairing this with saffron rice was an excellent choice. Glad everyone enjoyed it, we loved it and I think this
    recipe was easier to prepare than my usual osso buco recipe and not as strong flavored. Happy Halloween.

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  8. Your photos of the dish look so sunny and lovely. Good on you for streamlining the dish - I hate tedious steps too.

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  9. Your modifications sound spot on. I also used diced tomatoes, although I threw in the last few cherry ones from a batch. I like the Osso Buco à la Diane :-)

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    1. Bye bye Steak Diane... hello Osso Buco a la Diane.

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  10. I pretty much made the same changes you did Diane. Except that I also changed the veal to rabbit and I did add some cherry tomatoes that I had from the garden. This is pretty delicious however its done! Yours looks great!

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    1. I really love the idea of rabbit... so french too.

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  11. I think you made some good changes, without really changing the recipe. I liked the orange, but my husband could have done with less. I changed the process a bit and finished the simmering in a slow cooker.. I will have to try saffron rice next time!

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    1. I can definitely see this adapting well to a slow cooker. Great idea.

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  12. I bet you could have had your entire neighborhood stop by for dinner once they knew you were making osso bucco. Your changes sound sensible and I always like when efforts are reduced in making a dish. Thanks for posting those. My family makes saffron bread for the holidays - bright yellow bread. So, anything with saffron included works for me.

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    1. I've never heard of Saffron bread. Is it traditional from a certain place? It must look beautiful.

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  13. My husband thought the changing of pans for braising the meat and then cooking it was redundant. He used the one pan for all it worked out just fine. We also bought diced tomatoes and I wished I had used more since my sauce was a little dry.

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    1. I guess you could get a slightly better sear from a cast iron pan, but I didn't think it was worth washing another pan. Glad to hear someone else thought the same thing as me.

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  14. I just broke the tomatoes up in the pan, actually, but diced tomatoes would be a good idea. Yours looks like it turned out beautifully and the saffron rice is such a perfect, classic accompaniment.

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  15. This looks incredible! Thank you so much for linking up at Tasty Tuesday! Your recipe has been pinned to the Tasty Tuesday Pinterest board! Please join us again this week!

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  16. Looks delicious very nice thanks for sharing with Hearth and soul blog hop. pinning.

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  17. My husband loves osso buco. I've never had it with orange and at first it seems out there. But the osso buco recipe I use (Giada de Laurentiis) has a wonderfully lemony gremolata on top. That citrus finish is my favorite part--guess orange wouldn't be that far off.
    Thanks for sharing, Diane.

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  18. I love this variation on traditional Osso Buco, Diane! It sounds really flavourful. I like how you've simplified the recipe as well. Thank you for sharing with us at the Hearth and Soul hop.

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