"The best times you are going to have in life are at the dinner table and in bed." Old Italian saying. So relax, and enjoy the simple things!

Friday, March 6, 2015

Stuffed Cabbage with a Morel Cream Sauce #French Fridays with Dorie

Yum

Stuffed Cabbage with Morel Cream Sauce- simplelivingeating.com


When I ask my children to try something before they proclaim that they don't like it, I usually remind them that "It's not calves brains." 

My grandparents came from Italy and I was always reminded that in "the old country" they couldn't afford to waste any part of the animal. My grandmother would say, 
"With what an American family throws away an Italian family makes dinner." 

Stuffed Cabbage with Morel Cream Sauce- simplelivingeating.com

To really make their point about how spoiled us American children were when I visited my grandparents we would regularly have to eat some type of innards. Sometimes it was lamb's tongue, or Tripe (stomach lining of a cow) or pigs knuckles, but the one innards that I hated the most was calves brains... what can I say they were BRAINS, gray and mealy...truly gross!


Stuffed Cabbage with Morel Cream Sauce- simplelivingeating.com

Needless to say I never developed a love for any innards, an occasional liver pâté if it is seasoned well I  enjoy, but the rest I have no desire to eat, including foie gras which is tasty, but extremely rich... [and I don't buy that the goose doesn't suffer in order to make it.]

So when I was looking over Dorie's recipe for Cabbage and Foie Gras Bundles I became engrossed with the accompanying page titled "A Taste for Innards." A course made of cabbage stuffed with thymus gland and covered with a morel cream sauce seemed to have potential for adaptation. I think ground beef, pork or lamb would work well with this recipe, and the morel cream sauce could be poured on a steak or even a piece of chicken too... delicious. 



Stuffed Cabbage with a Morel Cream Sauce

by Diane Balch
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Keywords: bake, entree, gluten-free, cabbage, beef, French winter

Ingredients (4 - 6)
  • Sauce:
  • 4 dried morel mushrooms rehydrated in 1/2 cup of water
  • 4 tablespoons of butter
  • 2 shallots minced
  • 1/2 cup of Madeira wine
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons of cream
  • Stuffing:
  • 1 small cabbage with loose leaves
  • 1 tablespoon of butter
  • 1 pound of ground beef
  • 1 tablespoon of Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 cloves of garlic minced
  • 1/4 cup of fresh parsley chopped

Instructions
1) Pre-heat the oven to 300 degrees.

2) Put the mushrooms in a Pyrex measuring cup and heat it in the microwave for 2 minutes. Set aside for about 30 minutes until the mushrooms rehydrate add a pinch of salt into the water.

3) Put the cabbage in a large sauce pot and cover 3/4 of it with salted water. Bring to a boil.

4) As the leaves start to soften use tongs and a knife to cut them off. Have a baking sheet lined with paper towels ready to put the leaves on to dry.

5) As the cabbage is boiling begin sauteing in butter the shallots and garlic in a large skillet. Add the beef when the shallots start to wilt but before the garlic browns. Don't brown the garlic. Make sure you salt, pepper and pour the Worcestershire sauce over the beef before it cooks. Add the parsley when the beef is cooked through.

6) Put about 2 tablespoons of beef, pack it, at the base of each piece of cabbage. Fold it up and put it in a large baking pan fold sides down. Cover with foil and put in the oven to keep warm.

7) Use the skillet without cleaning it that you sauteed the beef in to make the sauce. First, add 2 tablespoons of butter to the skillet on medium high heat. When it melts add shallots and saute until they wilt.

8) While the shallots are cooking chop up the mushrooms into tiny piece. Add them to the skillet and cook for a minute. Then add the wine and stir until it bubbles.

9) Next add the water from the mushrooms and turn the heat up to high. Stir until the sauce starts to reduce. When it reduces, lower the heat to simmer and whisk in 2 to 4 tablespoons of cream until the sauce thickens a little.

10) Remove stuffed cabbage from oven and pour the sauce over it.
Serve with rice or potatoes. A nice side tomato salad or some glazed carrots works nicely with this dish.

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Note: As a member of French Friday's with Dorie I am not allowed to print the recipe. I invite you to take a look at this wonderful cookbook "Around My French Table" if you are interested in this or any other recipe I review. 

23 comments:

  1. Interesting substitutions, looks delicious.

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  2. Yeah, I could do this!!! Sounds delicious!!! My mom's grandfather owned a butcher shop---and their family always got what didn't sell. She was a huge fan of many innards--but I'm happy to pass!!

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    1. I think you are or you aren't an innards person. Eating them growing up doesn't seem to matter. My nephew was over for dinner last night and he was going on and on about how much he liked tripe and other innards. I know he didn't grow up eating them.

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  3. Your dish sounds like a tasty complete meal. I haven't eaten too many innards, but we've had some good liver recipes in this book.

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    1. It's funny I really did use to like paté. I just don't seem to have a taste for anything fatty other than whole milk yogurt. I guess your body tells you what it need... some day maybe I will return to liver.

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  4. Nice change out for this recipe... I think I would enjoy these also. Thanks for sharing... :)

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  5. First, I haven't even read the Innards Page so now I am hitting "the book" after I write this comment for a tutorial on innards. I agree with others, the Morel Cream Sauce sounds delicious. Your recipe looks quite tasty also. Making lemonade out of lemons!

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    1. Thanks Mary,
      I wasn't quite sure how to approach this dish when we got it.

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  6. Nice variation. Especially with the morels! That sauce sounds delicious.

    My dad's parents were very frugal farmers - 6 children + a farm meant that nothing went to waste. While there were some great things that came out of this (dandelion green and milkweed), some of the animal dishes were less appealing (looking at you liver and onions). Fortunately, my parents never forced us to eat tongue or some of the other parts. I think the liver was traumatic enough.

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    1. Lucky them... my grandmother had been a farmer and even though she wasn't on in America she felt the need to have us eat like we were on her farm.

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    2. What a story on innards. The only thing that I have to say to my son, regularly, is lucky it's not liver. The only thing I hated growing up was liver and onions. Thanks for the information on duck.

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    3. I wish I only had liver to deal with as a kid. My mother was found of liver and onions, I just didn't like the texture of the chicken livers, but it was nothing compared to what my grandparents fed me.

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  7. I really like what you came up with for this one. My parents made a pact when they got married that they would never eat liver and onions. They did eat chicken livers as good old Jewish chopped liver, which I didn't actually start eating until my mid-20s. Now I'm a huge pate fan. That's the extent of my innards eating.

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    1. It sounds like your parents had too many innards like me. I prefer pate, not straight up..though a liver covered in onions and bacon is not too bad.

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  8. ooo, I can't even imagine! I think this sounds oh so much better.

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  9. Looks great, very well substituted!

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  10. You really rocked this recipe, Diane! If there were awards you would win it! My grandparents were country people that raised their own animals and used every bit of it! I had to try lots of things I didn't want to put into my mouth! Your version of this looks great.

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  11. This is Kelli from Yum Goggle - thanks so much for submitting this beautiful recipe! Now following on FB, Twitter, and Pinterest - hope you will continue to submit!

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    1. Thank you so much. You're personal touch is wonderful.

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  12. Oh, Diane, this looks fantastic! Definitely saving this for later! I love how you drew inspiration from the facing page!

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    1. Thanks... it was stretch but I wanted to make some type of stuffed cabbage.

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  13. This looks amazing! I have never made stuffed cabbage and this looks so delicious. Thanks for joining us at the Family Fun Fridays linky party from happyandblessedhome.com. You post has been chosen as one of our featured recipes! Please visit brittalafont.com (Recipes Hostess) on Thursday, after 2pm MST to grab your "I was Featured" button and see your featured post! Already pinned it!

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  14. HI Diane,
    We will just love your Stuffed Cabbage! Happy St. Patrick's Day and thanks so much for sharing with Full Plate Thursday!
    Miz Helen

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